vocation

First Sunday in Lent

February 17, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Deuteronomy 26:1-11
Reading 2: 
Psalms 91:1-2, 9-16
Reading 3: 
Romans 10:8b-13
Reading 4: 
Luke 4:1-13
By Bruce G. Epperly

The reading from Luke 4:1-13 is the traditional centerpiece for the First Sunday in Lent, and it should be. In many ways, Lent invites us to explore our values. The Lenten season invites us to self-examination: What is truly important to us? Where are our deepest values and how do we embody them in daily life? Where is God in our lives? 

Second Sunday after the Epiphany

January 20, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 62:1-5
Reading 2: 
Psalm 36:5-10
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 12:1-11
Reading 4: 
John 2:1-11
By Bruce G. Epperly

The Season of Epiphany inspires us to look for the light in ourselves and in the world around us. In God’s light, we see light, the Psalmist proclaims, and if God’s light is omnipresent, then all places vibrate with divine energy. Divine energy moves through all things presenting them possibilities and the inspiration and eros to embody them. Still, we are free to shape God’s energetic possibilities and even turn away from them by ignoring them or misusing them. When we open to the light, we see divine light in ourselves and others.

Fifth Sunday after Epiphany

February 5, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 40:21-31
Reading 2: 
Psalm 147:1-11, 20c
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 9:16-23
Reading 4: 
Mark 1:29-39
By Bruce G. Epperly

Today’s readings join the themes of vocation and power. When we are in tune with God’s movements in our lives, we mediate power that transforms our lives and the world. This power does not insulate us from life’s tragedies and failures, but it gives us insight and courage to respond to them.

2nd Sunday after Epiphany

January 20, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 49:1-7
Reading 2: 
Psalm 40:1-11
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 1:1-9
Reading 4: 
John 1: 29-42
By Bruce G. Epperly

Contributed by Bruce G. Epperly & Anna Rollins

What does it mean to be called by God? In the Isaiah passage, the prophet speaks of a divine vocation that began with his conception. Within the matrix of possibilities, God envisaged a broad plan for the prophet even before he emerged from his mother’s womb.

2nd Sunday after Epiphany

January 20, 2008
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 49:1-7
Reading 2: 
Psalm 40:1-11
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 1:1-9
Reading 4: 
John 1:29-42
By Bruce G. Epperly

The Isaiah reading integrates call and response, and providence and vocation. While the passage can be read as an example of divine election in the most absolute terms, that is, God has a clear plan for everyone established before her or his birth, it can also point to God’s careful, gentle, and contextual providence that guides and inspires us in partnership with our own personal decisions and plans for the future. No doubt, the authors of Isaiah had a strong sense of God’s presence in their lives and in the unfolding of history.

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