Trinity Sunday

Trinity Sunday

June 8, 2001
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Proverbs 8:1-4, 22-31
Reading 2: 
Psalm 8
Reading 3: 
Romans 5:1-5
Reading 4: 
John 16:12-15
By Marjorie Suchocki

The Proverbs texts speaks about a personified Wisdom (associated in the tradition with both Sophia and Logos, Son and Spirit), present with God at the beginning of creation. It compares with Genesis 1, where God creates through speaking a Word, and moving as Spirit over the face of the waters.

Psalm 8 is a creation psalm, exalting the God of creation and marveling at our own place in the order of creation.

Trinity Sunday

June 3, 2007
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Proverbs 8:1-4, 22-31
Reading 2: 
Psalm 8
Reading 3: 
Romans 5:1-5
Reading 4: 
John 16:12-15
By Bruce G. Epperly

Wisdom is calling! Wisdom is still speaking – on the street corner, at the marketplace, as you read the newspaper, as you consider the bumble bee, and watch the clouds scudding by on a summer afternoon. Wisdom’s call is “to all that live.”

Wisdom is calling – everywhere and within everything! Proverbs 8 proclaims the ubiquity of divine wisdom. Is Wisdom God herself, or the Logos, or the Spirit embodied in ordinary moments as well as moments of dramatic revelation? God is love, and divine love is wisdom embodied in acts of beauty and justice.

Trinity Sunday

June 7, 2009
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 6:1-8
Reading 2: 
Psalm 29
Reading 3: 
Romans 8:12-17
Reading 4: 
John 3:1-17
By Rick Marshall

Reflecting on Preaching:

Trinity Sunday

June 11, 2006
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 6:1-8
Reading 2: 
Psalm 29
Reading 3: 
Romans 8:12-17
Reading 4: 
John 3:1-17
By Marjorie Suchocki

The texts from the Hebrew Scriptures speak of the glory of God, while the two New Testament texts speak of the triadic experience of the work of God in salvation history. Both testaments together provide a springboard for this unique Sunday specifically devoted to worship of God as Trinity.

Trinity Sunday

June 15, 2003
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 6:1-8
Reading 2: 
Psalm 29
Reading 3: 
Romans 8:12-17
Reading 4: 
John 3:1-17
By Vernon Goff

John 3:1-17

Trinity Sunday

June 18, 2000
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 6:1-8
Reading 2: 
Psalm 29
Reading 3: 
Romans 8:12-17
Reading 4: 
John 3:1-17
By Patricia Farmer

This week I want to share with you a sermon I wrote on the first part of the Gospel reading for this week, John 3:1-17. It expresses the process idea of God being the “whisperer of possibilities" in our darkness. Like a lot of right brain preachers I use lots of stories and metaphors, so don't expect a scholarly exegesis. (I find such sermons exceedingly boring.) I hope this one brings to life for you Nicodemus' quandary in a fresh and novel way!

Trinity Sunday

May 18, 2008
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 1:1-2:4a
Reading 2: 
Psalm 8
Reading 3: 
2 Corinthians 13:11-13
Reading 4: 
Matthew 28:16-20
By Rick Marshall

On the Trinity
The historical definition of the Trinity makes very little sense to me. It is a confusing mystification of the divine nature using old arguments based on substance philosophy and how the three aspects of God are related. Substance philosophy is no longer persuasive and therefore undercuts the rationale for the Trinity. This idea of faith is a fundamental distraction from what the general definition of faith tends to be in the Bible, which is trusting the power of the resurrecting God.  

Trinity Sunday

May 22, 2005
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 1:1-2:4a
Reading 2: 
Psalm 8
Reading 3: 
2 Corinthians 13:11-13
Reading 4: 
Matthew 28:16-20
By Paul S. Nancarrow

In preaching on Trinity Sunday, I often point out that it is the only day in the church year given to the celebration of a theological doctrine. Other days on the liturgical calendar are given to the celebration of events in the life of Christ (Christmas, Easter), or images of Christ’s ministry (Good Shepherd Sunday, Christ the King Sunday), or events in the life of the church (saints’ days, World Communion Sunday, Reformation Sunday).

Trinity Sunday

May 26, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 1:1-2:4a
Reading 2: 
Psalm 8
Reading 3: 
2 Corinthians 13:11-13
Reading 4: 
Matthew 28:16-20
By

The readings for Trinity Sunday begin with the creation story, subtly underscoring the unity of God. There is one creator of the universe, and however complicated the Trinitarian formula became, with its talk of three persons, we are not to forget that "The Lord our God is One." The context for Trinity is ever, always, divine unity.

Trinity Sunday, First Sunday after Pentecost

May 30, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Proverbs 8:1-4, 22-31
Reading 2: 
Psalm 8
Reading 3: 
Romans 5:1-5
Reading 4: 
John 16: 12-15
By Rick Marshall

Reflecting on preaching

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