transformation

Fifth Sunday of Easter

May 18, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 7:55-60
Reading 2: 
Psalm 31:1-5, 15-16
Reading 3: 
I Peter 2:2-10
Reading 4: 
John 14:1-14
By Bruce Epperly

Today’s readings portray mystical and unitive experiences that issue in changed perspectives on the challenges of life. Mysticism often provides us with a greater perspective that liberates us from self-centeredness and defensiveness, thus enabling us to live compassionately.

Fourth Sunday of Easter

May 11, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:42-47
Reading 2: 
Psalm 23
Reading 3: 
I Peter 2:19-25
Reading 4: 
John 10:1-10
By Bruce G. Epperly

Healthy spirituality is all-season: it embraces mind, body, spirit, and relationships; individual and community; sickness and health; contemplation and action; and abundance and scarcity. It promotes individual transformation, and points individuals toward God’s larger global missions.

Second Sunday of Easter

April 27, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:14a, 22-32
Reading 2: 
Psalm 16
Reading 3: 
I Peter 1:3-9
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-31
By Bruce G. Epperly

We can experience resurrection power in miraculous ways. We can experience divine resuscitations, breathing with Jesus, restoring spirits and communities in ways we never would have expected.

Fourth Sunday in Lent

March 30, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
I Sam 16: -1-13
Reading 2: 
Psalm 12
Reading 3: 
Ephesians 5:8-14
Reading 4: 
John 9:1-41
By Marjorie Suchocki

The texts deal with good versus evil, with I Samuel challenging assumptions concerning inward versus outward goodness, and the Psalm repeating the ever-present plaint: why do evil doers flourish while the righteous go unrewarded? The New Testament texts continue the theme of good versus bad actions, using imagery of moral light and darkness in Ephesians, and physical versus spiritual blindness in the gospel.

Fifth Sunday of Easter

April 28, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 11:1-18
Reading 2: 
Psalm 148
Reading 3: 
Revelation 21:1-6
Reading 4: 
John 13:31-35
By Russell Pregeant

The book of Acts tells the story of the early church, and it is a story of transformations. Characters, most particularly Peter and Paul, undergo transformation; and so does the church itself. Paul’s change is the most dramatic—a complete turnaround from a bitter opponent of the gospel to a courageous bearer of the word into the Gentile world. Peter’s is equally significant, however; and both characters’ faith journeys are central to the plot of Luke-Acts.

Proper 18

September 9, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Proverbs 2:1-2, 8-9, 22-23
Reading 2: 
Isaiah 35:4-7a
Reading 3: 
James 2:1-17
Reading 4: 
Mark 7:24-37
Alt Reading 2: 
Psalm 146
Alt Reading 1: 
Psalm 125
By David Grant Smith

Proverbs 22 / Psalm 125                   

Proper 13

August 5, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
2 Samuel 11:26-12:13a
Reading 2: 
Psalm 51
Reading 3: 
Ephesians 4:1-16
Reading 4: 
John 6:24-35
By Mary Ricketts

2 Samuel 11:26-12:13a

The Prophet Nathan's confrontation of David's liaison with Bathsheba is perhaps familiar ground for you.

Fourth Sunday in Lent

March 18, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Numbers 21:4-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 107:1-3, 17-22
Reading 3: 
Ephesians 2:1-10
Reading 4: 
John 3:14-21
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Numbers 21:4-9

Third Sunday in Lent

March 11, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Exodus 20:1-17
Reading 2: 
Psalm 19
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 1:18-25
Reading 4: 
John 2:13-22
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Exodus 20:1-17

God’s covenant with Israel delivered through Moses, the third in the series of covenants related in the First Testament readings for Lent, increases the specificity introduced in last week’s reading. The covenant with Noah embraced all humanity; the covenant with Abraham and Sarah extended to a multitude of nations and peoples; the covenant through Moses is with one nation, one distinctive people, who are called to a distinctive way of life in the world.

Third Sunday of Advent

December 11, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 61:1-4, 8-11
Reading 2: 
Psalm 126
Reading 3: 
I Thessalonians 5:16-24
Reading 4: 
John 1:6-8, 19-28
By Bruce G. Epperly

Today’s scriptures join mysticism and mission, and celebration and challenge. Holistic spirituality transforms our souls, but it also expands our level of concern such that the well-being of others and ourselves is one dynamic reality. The prophetic soul is lively, inclusive, and relational. It embraces otherness as part of our deepest reality. The prophetic soul sees the futures of others as connected with our own futures. Our present commitments to justice and shalom bring health to the futures of others as well as ourselves.

Bodily Resurrection

Question: 
Ever since I encountered Lewis Ford's account of the resurrection appearances in the chapter in The Lure of God, I have sought out process theology's answer to the question of a bodily resurrection. Currently I am reading your chapter on the resurrection in Christ in a Pluralistic Age and I was curious to see how much you have changed in the 30-plus years since that book was published. What would John B. Cobb, Jr., say today if he were in a debate with someone such as, say, William Lane Craig. What is the process approach to the resurrection of Christ?
Publication Month: 
May 2007
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

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