salvation

Proper 12

July 27, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 29:15-28
Reading 2: 
Psalm 105:1-11,45b
Reading 3: 
Romans 8:26-39
Reading 4: 
Matthew 13:31-33, 44-52
By Marti J. Steussy

Today’s Genesis reading continues a focus on Israel’s ancestors. This story, written before the idea of “Bible” was invented, probably wasn’t intended as religious instruction. It doesn’t mention God, doesn’t present us with good role models, and doesn’t have a lesson beyond “what goes around, comes around.” It’s a family story: “Remember old Jake? He was a real scrapper! Why, he’d even wrassle with God if he had the chance! But Uncle Laban took him down a notch…”

Seventh Sunday of Easter

May 12, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 16:16-34
Reading 2: 
Psalm 97
Reading 3: 
Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, 20-21
Reading 4: 
John 17:20-26
By Russell Pregeant

Jesus’ long farewell to his disciples in John begins at 13:31-35, with his declaration of the mutual glorification that obtains between himself and God and his statement of the “new commandment” to “love one another.” It ends with 17:20-26, which reiterates both themes, so that the discourse is framed by these motifs, identifying them as the dominant thread in the entire section.[1] Although part of the farewell, these verses are spoken to God in prayer, rather than to the disciples. The prayer begins at 17:1 and ends with v.

Salvation after Death?

Question: 
“In talking to some of my fundamental Christian friends the claim has been made that physical death holds the finality of acceptance of salvation, i.e. salvation must be attained prior to physical death. I just can't see physical death as being the absolute final 'chance.' I've looked and have not found anything in the Bible that says that death is the final point of acceptance or rejection. I know that this is the tradition in many denominations but I wonder if this also holds true in process theology.”
Publication Month: 
January 2005
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

Salvation

Question: 
If Jesus Christ is our Lord and Savior, who is Gautama Buddha?
Publication Month: 
September 2001
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

For a long time Christians viewed religious traditions as inherently competitive. This was true of alternative forms of Christianity. If Catholics were right, Protestants were wrong. If the magisterial Reformers were right, the Baptists and Quakers were wrong. If Calvinists were right, Lutherans were wrong. If the high Calvinists were right, the Arminians were wrong. And so forth.

Are You Saved?

Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

John 3:1-17 

What did Jesus mean by salvation?

I have always found it difficult to answer the question, "Are you saved?" Indeed, the only answer I can give is another question: "What do you mean by 'saved'?"

Believers who ask whether one is saved often find that kind of response offensive. For some of them, "saved" has a perfectly clear meaning, one they suppose is established by the Bible. For me to respond with a question seems to them an academic dodge.

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