Ron Allen

Seventh Sunday of Easter

May 17, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 1:1-11/Luke 24:44-53
Reading 2: 
Psalm 93
Reading 3: 
Ephesians 1:15-23
Reading 4: 
John 17:6-19
By Ron Allen

SEVENTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

(Observed as Ascension Sunday)

May 17, 2015

 

Acts 1:1-11/Luke 24:44-53

Sixth Sunday of Easter

May 10, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 10:44-48
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 3: 
1 John 5:1-6
Reading 4: 
John 15:9-17
By Ron Allen

SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

May 10, 2015

 

Acts 10:44-48

Luke’s Jesus is an end-time prophet who announced that the transition from the old age to the Realm is underway. The Realm can be partially realized in the present, especially through the eschatological community of the church, but will be fully manifest only after the apocalypse

Fifth Sunday of Easter

May 3, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 8:26-40
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22:25-31
Reading 3: 
1 John 4:7-21
Reading 4: 
John 15:1-8
By Ron Allen

FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

May 3, 2015

 

Acts 8:26-40

This story has suffered considerable exegetical abuse in the name of a good cause. The preacher contrasts restrictive, legalistic, oppressive Judaism that excluded the Eunuch from participating in the religious life of the temple with Jesus and the apostles who welcomed the Eunuch into the church with “boundary-shattering” inclusiveness.

Fourth Sunday of Easter

April 26, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 4:5-12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 23
Reading 3: 
1 John 3:16-24
Reading 4: 
John 10:11-18
By Ron Allen

FOURTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

April 26, 2015


Acts 4:5-12

Third Sunday of Easter

April 19, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 3:12-19
Reading 2: 
Psalm 4
Reading 3: 
1 John 3:1-7
Reading 4: 
Luke 24:36b-48
By Ron Allen

THIRD SUNDAY OF EASTER

April 19, 2015

Acts 3:12-19

A basic principle of exegesis is that the interpreter should mark the starting and ending of a text at natural division points. The lectionary violates this principle by ending the reading with Acts 3:19 which is mid-way through a sentence. The reading should be Acts 3:12-26.

Easter

April 5, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 25:6-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 15:1-11
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18
By Ron Allen

 

Isaiah 25:6-9

Proper 8

June 29, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 22:1-14
Reading 2: 
Psalm 13
Reading 3: 
Romans 6:12-23
Reading 4: 
Matthew 10:40-42
By Ron Allen

The Priestly theologians gave Genesis 22:1-14 its present shape in the shadow of the exile. Two themes are especially important. First, the text rejects child sacrifice. Some of Israel’s neighbors followed this practice (e.g. Deut 12:31; 2 Kgs 16:3; 21:6; 23;10; Isa 57:5; Jer 7:31; 19:5; 32:35), but according to Genesis 21:1-14, God never intended child sacrifice (cf. Lev 18:21; 20:2-5).

Proper 7

June 22, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 21:8-21
Reading 2: 
Psalm 86:1-10, 16-17
Reading 3: 
Romans 6:1b-11
Reading 4: 
Matthew 10:24-39
By Ron Allen

The Priestly theologians gave the book of Genesis its present form shortly after the exile. The Priests believed that God sought to bless the entire world and that Israel had a particular mission within that purpose, namely, to alert the other nations to blessing.

Trinity Sunday

June 15, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 1:1-2:4a
Reading 2: 
Psalm 8
Reading 3: 
2 Cor 13:11-13
Reading 4: 
Matthew 28:16-20
By Ron Allen

Because Trinity Sunday explores the doctrine of the Trinity, I begin with a disclaimer. With a small stream in the Stone-Campbell Movement, I do not believe in the Trinity. I regard God as singularly One, with Jesus and the Spirit as God’s close agents. But, in the ecumenical spirit of my tradition, the comments that follow offer preaching possibilities friendly to Trinitarianism.

Pentecost

June 8, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Numbers 11:24-30
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35v
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-23 or 7:37-39
Alt Reading 2: 
1 Cor 12:3-13
Alt Reading 1: 
Acts 2:1-21
By Ron Allen

On the Sundays after Easter, the Revised Common Lectionary turns its back on the Torah, Prophets and Writings by replacing that reading with one from Acts. This displacement is regrettable as it reinforces anti-Jewish instincts buried deep within the church. Consequently, in my view, on Pentecost Day the church should read from Numbers when the lectionary gives the choice between Numbers and Acts.

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