Process Theology

4th Sunday of Advent

December 21, 2014
Reading 1: 
2 Samuel 7:1-11, 16
Reading 3: 
Romans 16:25-27
Reading 4: 
Luke 1:26-38, 46-55
By Bruce G. Epperly

This lectionary commentary was first published on December 21, 2008.

 

3rd Sunday of Advent

December 14, 2014
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 61:1-4, 8-11
Reading 2: 
Psalm 126
Reading 3: 
1 Thessalonians 5:16-24
Reading 4: 
John 1:6-8, 19-28
By Bruce G. Epperly

This Lectionary Commentary was first published on December 14, 2008.

 

2nd Sunday of Advent

December 7, 2014
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 40:1-11
Reading 2: 
Psalm 85:1-2, 8-13
Reading 3: 
2 Peter 3:8-15a
Reading 4: 
Mark 1:1-8
By Bruce G. Epperly

This Lectionary Commentary was first published on December 7, 2008.

 

1st Sunday of Advent

November 30, 2014
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 64:1-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 80:1-7, 17-19
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 1:3-9
Reading 4: 
Mark 13:24-37
By Bruce G. Epperly

This lectionary commentary was first published on November 23, 2008.

 

Process and Post-Structuralism

Question: 
Do you find the discussion between process thought and post-structuralism worthwhile?
Publication Month: 
February 2012
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

A simple answer to this question is “Yes.” But that would mean very little. I think that process thinkers can benefit from discussion with any group of thoughtful people who approach matters from a different point of view. There is no one right point of view. We are all shaped by our particular histories and they have alerted us to different features of reality. We can enlarge our horizons and enrich our understanding by engaging many discussion partners.

New! The Process Perspective II

book coverby John B. Cobb, Jr., edited by Jeanyne B. Slettom

This book begins where the original book, The Process Perspective left off. Retaining its reader-friendly, question-and-answer format, John B. Cobb, Jr., tackles new questions and misunderstandings about process theology. Divided into three sections Metaphysics, Science, and Faith--a variety of questions on topics of contemporary interest are addressed. What is the process theology view of angels and demons? How does process theology explain free will? How does it respond to stem cells and ensoulment? What about God and Suffering? What is the Relationship between Process, Evangelical, and Liberal Theologies? In answering these and other questions, Cobb opens our minds to new understandings and gives us new ways to relate to our world and the God at work within it.

Omnipotence and other Theological Mistakes

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Is it possible to be a Wesleyan and a Process thinker?

Question: 
Is it possible to be a Wesleyan and a Process thinker? If so... How?
Publication Month: 
April 2011
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

This question reflects a widespread concern that adopting a philosophy that emerged only in recent times cannot be easily united with acceptance of biblical authority. I will briefly address that broader question before dealing with the specifics of the relation of process thought to that of John Wesley.

Process Theology: An Introductory Exposition

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Praying for Jennifer: An Exploration of Intercessory Prayer in Story Form

Author:

John B Cobb Jr

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Is it too Late?

Author:

John B. Cobb Jr

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Becoming a Thinking Christian: If We Want Church Renewal, We Will Have to Renew Thinking in the Church

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From Sacred Lies to Holy Wisdom

Author:

Judith Casanova

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Proper 29/Christ the King (Reign of Christ)

November 25, 2001
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 23:1-6
Reading 2: 
Psalm 46
By John B. Cobb, Jr.

Jeremiah’s prophesies are not apocalyptic. Hence process theologians can take them much more straightforwardly. Jeremiah is hoping that a descendant of David will assume the throne of Israel and create a nation to which the widely dispersed Jews can return. He pronounced this vision of a hopeful future at a very low period of Israel’s condition. All of its leaders had been carried into exile or had fled to Egypt. Israel and Judah as nations had ceased to exist.

Proper 29/Christ the King (Reign of Christ)

November 21, 2004
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 23:1-6
Reading 3: 
Colossians 1:11-20
Reading 4: 
Luke 1:68-79 and Luke 23:33-43
By Paul S. Nancarrow

The final Sunday of the liturgical year is traditionally recognized as the feast of Christ the King, or, more inclusively, the feast of the Reign of Christ. The lessons appointed for the day all reflect this theme. But the notion of the Reign of Christ can present the contemporary interpreter with significant challenges, especially as we wrestle with the religious dimensions and ethical consequences of the emerging American Empire.

Proper 29/Christ the King (Reign of Christ)

November 25, 2007
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 23:1-6
Reading 3: 
Colossians 1:11-20
Reading 4: 
Luke 23:33-43
By Russell Pregeant

The readings from Jeremiah, Colossians, and Luke provide material for an interesting take on the theme of the Reign of Christ. Colossians 1:11-20 includes a hymn (vv. 15-20) that embraces a number of themes: Christ’s pre-existence and status as the one in whom all things cohere; the resurrection and exaltation; Christ’s role as the head of the church; and Christ’s work of universal reconciliation through his death on the cross.

Proper 28

November 18, 2001
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Malachi 4:1-2a
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
By John B. Cobb, Jr.

Psalm 98 expresses a quite different mood – one of joyful triumph. It seems at first that the triumph is God’s and that we can celebrate quite unequivocally with the Psalmist. Surely as Christians we hope for God’s victory in the world! But as the Psalm continues, it becomes clear that God’s victory is identified with the victory of Israel.

Proper 28

November 14, 2004
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 65:17-25
Reading 3: 
2 Thessalonians 3:6-13
Reading 4: 
Luke 21:5-19
Alt Reading 1: 
Isaiah 12
By Paul S. Nancarrow

On this second-to-last Sunday of the lectionary cycle, the readings swing into full apocalyptic mode for the end of the Church Year. In this passage from Isaiah, we get the “positive” side of the apocalypse: the promise of a new heaven and a new earth, in which God’s holy mountain will be a peaceable kingdom and the city of Jerusalem will be re-created as a joy and its people as a delight.

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