Pentecost

The Day of Pentecost

May 24, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:1-21
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:25-35, 37
Reading 3: 
Romans 8:22-27
Reading 4: 
John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15
By David Grant Smith

The Day of Pentecost

24 May 2015

David Grant Smith

 

Pentecost

June 8, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Numbers 11:24-30
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35v
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-23 or 7:37-39
Alt Reading 2: 
1 Cor 12:3-13
Alt Reading 1: 
Acts 2:1-21
By Ron Allen

On the Sundays after Easter, the Revised Common Lectionary turns its back on the Torah, Prophets and Writings by replacing that reading with one from Acts. This displacement is regrettable as it reinforces anti-Jewish instincts buried deep within the church. Consequently, in my view, on Pentecost Day the church should read from Numbers when the lectionary gives the choice between Numbers and Acts.

Third Sunday of Easter

May 4, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:1-4a. 36-41
Reading 2: 
Psalm 116:1-4, 12-19
Reading 3: 
I Peter 1:17-23
Reading 4: 
Luke 24:13-25
By Bruce G. Epperly

Salvation or wholeness comes in many ways. If God has a truly personal relationship with each of us, then there is no “one size that fits all” approach to salvation on the pathway to wholeness. Rather, there are many ways to experience God’s empowering and transforming presence.

Pentecost

May 27, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:1-21
Reading 2: 
Ezekiel 37:1-14
Reading 3: 
Romans 8:22-27
Reading 4: 
John 15: 26-27; 16:4b-15
By Jeanyne B Slettom

Acts 2:1-21

Pentecost

June 12, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:1-21
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 12:3b-13
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-23
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Pentecost serves in many respects as the “Feast of the Holy Spirit” in Christian traditions. The three New Testament readings assigned for this day each reflect a slightly different understanding of the role and function of the Spirit in the world, but they converge around the theme that the work of the Holy Spirit in believers and in the cosmos is specifically manifested in the making of relationships and the unification of many into one.

Pentecost Sunday

May 30, 2004
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21 or Romans 8:14-17
Reading 4: 
John 14:8-17, (25-27)
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 2:1-21

Pentecost Sunday

May 27, 2007
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21 or Romans 8:14-17
Reading 4: 
John 14:8-17, (25-27)
By Bruce G. Epperly

As I was reflecting on the Pentecost reading this morning, I came home from my pre-dawn walk to the morning paper’s headline, “if we don’t pray who’s going to?” While I have long heard that Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is at the heart of the Bible-belt of the North, I was surprised that the article was not about a recent tragedy or act of violence, but the National Day of Prayer. I frankly didn’t even know that May 3 was singled out as this year’s day of American prayer and fasting.

Pentecost Sunday

May 23, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 11:1-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21 or Romans 8:14-17
Reading 4: 
John 14:8-17, (25-27)
By Rick Marshall

Reflecting on preaching

Pentecost

May 31, 2009
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21 or Romans 8:22-27
Reading 4: 
John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15
By Jeanyne Slettom

What does a process pastor, who preaches the ongoing presence of God, do with Pentecost? The Pentecost readings, especially the one from Acts, describe the arrival of the Spirit as though it is a new thing. In John, the arrival of this “Advocate” is contingent on the death of Jesus, further reinforcing the idea of an event occurring consequentially, in time.

Pentecost

June 4, 2006
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21 or Romans 8:22-27
Reading 4: 
John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15
By Marjorie Suchocki

The Psalm is an exultation over the continuously creative care of God for this whole earth, while Our New Testament passages all focus on the coming and the role of the Holy Spirit in the church. Clearly there is a relationship between the texts, for through the Spirit God creatively calls the church in to being, and continuously cares for the church.

Pentecost

June 8, 2003
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Ezekiel 37:1-14
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21 or Romans 8:22-27
Reading 4: 
John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15
By Vernon Goff

Pentecost Sunday places an unmistakable emphasis on the spiritual aspect of God and human beings. It makes clear that in the Christian tradition it is expected that Christians be "filled with the spirit". A level of importance is placed on this emphasis to the degree that it becomes essential if one is to have a meaningful internal relationship with God. Furthermore it is essential if one is to be an effective partner with God in achieving the values of life which God makes possible and desires for us.

Pentecost

June 11, 2000
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Ezekiel 37:1-14
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
Acts 2:1-21 or Romans 8:22-27
Reading 4: 
John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15
By Patricia Farmer

For this Sunday I wish to focus on the text from Acts because of its sheer power and imagery for Pentecost Sunday (and because I have a really cool story to share.)

Pentecost Sunday

May 11, 2008
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 12:3b-13 or Acts 2:1-21
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-23 or John 7:37-39
By Bruce G. Epperly

The Center for Progressive Christianity and a number of affiliated organizations have designated this year’s Pentecost Sunday as “Pluralism Sunday,” in which participating congregations are invited to “celebrate the many paths to God at Pentecost.” While this is a laudable effort, and I support it fully, today’s passages celebrate much more than religious pluralism. They proclaim a spirit-centered faith, grounded in the personal and global inspiration of God’s Holy Spirit.

Pentecost Sunday

May 15, 2005
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 12:3b-13 or Acts 2:1-21
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-23
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Pentecost serves in many respects as the “Feast of the Holy Spirit” in Christian traditions. The work of the Holy Spirit in the world and in believers is often specifically tied to relationships and the unification of many into one. John Macquarrie calls the Spirit “unitive Being”; Peter Hodgson thinks of the Spirit as the “synthesis” in the divine dialectic. For a process-relational view, it is especially suggestive to look at the Spirit as God’s power of relationality at work in the world.

Pentecost Sunday

May 19, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 12:3b-13 or Acts 2:1-21
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-23
By Jeanyne B. Slettom

The incarnation narrative solves the problem of how a transcendent God, beyond space and time, can enter the world of human understanding. But after the crucifixion, resurrection, and ascension, the problem shifts. God entered the world in the person of Jesus. When the material presence of Jesus is no more, how does God stay in the world? How do Jesus' followers explain the abiding presence of Jesus that they continue to feel? The answer appears in the tongues of fire that descend upon the disciples on the day of Pentecost.

Breathing Space

Author - First Name: 
Bruce G.
Author - Last Name: 
Epperly

2nd Sunday of Easter

Psalm 150
John 20:19-31

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