parable

Proper 7

June 24, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Job 38:1-11
Reading 2: 
Psalm 107: 1-3, 23-32
Reading 3: 
2 Corinthians 6:1-13
Reading 4: 
Mark 4:35-41
By Jeanyne B Slettom

Job 38:1-11

Proper 23A

October 9, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Exodus 32:1-14
Reading 2: 
Psalm 106:1-6
Reading 3: 
Philippians 4:1-9
Reading 4: 
Matthew 22:1-14
Alt Reading 2: 
Pslam 23
Alt Reading 1: 
Isaiah 25:1-9
By Rick Marshall

Discussing the Texts

It seems to be “party time” with two of the texts. The text from Exodus is the famous telling of the Golden Calf incident. The other text is from the Matthew, the parable of the Wedding Banquet. But the two stories couldn’t be different and so it would be fruitful to compare them. Even the text from Isaiah is joyful, as is the text from Philippians. What are all the texts celebrating? For one thing, they all celebrate a change in future prospects when the divine presence is taken into account.

Proper 22A

October 2, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Exodus 20:1-4, 7-9, 12-20
Reading 2: 
Psalm 19
Reading 3: 
Philippians 3:4b-14
Reading 4: 
Matthew 21:33-46
By Rick Marshall

Discussing the Texts

Exodus: 20:1-4, 7-9, 12-20

It is interesting that the lectionary omits verses 4-6, where the divine language has a very sharp edge: “I am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents.” Other verses, 10-11, are left out with no apparent reason based on the text. If I were to preach on this text, I would use verses 1-20. There is no point in ignoring difficult parts of the Bible. In fact, addressing difficult texts can often bear more fruit than a non-problematic text.

Proper 21A

September 25, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Exodus 17:1-7
Reading 2: 
Psalm 78:1-4, 12-16
Reading 3: 
Philippians 2:1-13
Reading 4: 
Matthew 21:23-32
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Exodus 17:1-7

There is a pun in the opening clause of the opening verse of this passage, which has no basis in the original Hebrew, but which seems irresistibly inviting in English: “From the wilderness of Sin the whole congregation of the Israelites journeyed.” “Sin” here is of course a place name, related to Sinai, the area through which the people must travel to reach the mountain of theophany and covenant. It is mere accident that it sounds in English like the state of being alienated from God; yet the accident seems significant enough to comment on.

Proper 20A

September 18, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Exodus 16:2-15
Reading 2: 
Psalm 105:1-6, 37-45
Reading 3: 
Philippians 1:21-30
Reading 4: 
Matthew 20:1-16
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Exodus 16:2-15

Proper 19A

September 11, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Exodus 14:19-31
Reading 2: 
Psalm 114
Reading 3: 
Romans 14:1-12
Reading 4: 
Matthew 18:21-35
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Exodus 14:19-31

Proper 10

July 11, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Amos 7:7-17
Reading 3: 
Colossians 1:1-14
Reading 4: 
Luke 10:25-37
Alt Reading 1: 
Deuteronomy 30:9-14
By Russell Pregeant

The gospel reading could be combined with the Amos text to good effect in a sermon stressing the inclusiveness that characterizes God’s love and is hence required of those who follow Christ. The introduction to the parable of the Good Samarian in Luke 10:25-29 sets the stage as Jesus endorses the lawyer’s summation of the law in the dual love commandment. And the parable itself, combined with the conclusion of the pericope in vv. 36-37, provides a specific focus on the “other”—the outsider, the enemy, the unacceptable one—as the unlikely neighbor to whom one owes one’s love.

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