mercy

Proper 12

July 28, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Hosea 1:2-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 85
Reading 3: 
Colossians 2:6-15 (16-19)
Reading 4: 
Luke 11:1-13
By Mary Ricketts

Hosea 1:2-10

When I read a passage like this one from Hosea, I always wonder what people who believe the scriptures are inerrant think. The prophet gives us an amazingly strong and provocative image of experiencing God's disappointment in the chosen people. It speaks to their unfaithfulness to God's covenant in a powerful way. I once heard a psychologist comment that if you want to make a lasting impression about the way you feel about something or someone, tell a symbolic story that conveys the feelings of the event or person.

Proper 9

July 8, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Ezekiel 2:1-5
Reading 2: 
Psalm 123
Reading 3: 
2 Corinthians 12:2-10
Reading 4: 
Mark 6:1-13
By Paul Nancarrow

Ezekiel 2:1-5

This passage is part of the call narrative of Ezekiel, specifically the moment when God commissions Ezekiel to be God’s prophet. Leading up to this call is Ezekiel’s vision of the throne-chariot of God, which takes up all of Chapter 1 of the book, and leaves Ezekiel so overwhelmed by divine glory that he collapses in a heap on the bank of the Chebar River. It is because Ezekiel is thus dazed and confused that God must begin with him by saying “O mortal, stand up on your feet, and I will speak with you.”

Syndicate content