Logos

Process Christians and the Nicene Creed

Question: 
Should process Christians affirm the Nicene Creed?
Publication Month: 
November 2013
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

If “to affirm” means to agree with everything in it, then the answer with regard to the Nicene Creed must surely be No. But that would apply to virtually anything. In that sense I do not affirm the Bible or Luther or even Whitehead. I assume that is not the meaning of the question.

Historical Jesus or Cosmic Christ

Question: 
Which is more important, the historical Jesus or the Cosmic Christ?
Publication Month: 
July 2013
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

In order to answer relatively simply, I will understand the Cosmic Christ to be what, in the prologue to John’s gospel, is called the Logos. That identification answers the question. The Logos is more important. It is one with God, and there is no creation apart from the Logos. Life and intelligence are singled out as the work of the Logos. In Whitehead’s language, the Logos is the Primordial Nature of God. No creature can be comparable in importance.

Seventh Sunday of Easter

May 12, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 16:16-34
Reading 2: 
Psalm 97
Reading 3: 
Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, 20-21
Reading 4: 
John 17:20-26
By Russell Pregeant

Jesus’ long farewell to his disciples in John begins at 13:31-35, with his declaration of the mutual glorification that obtains between himself and God and his statement of the “new commandment” to “love one another.” It ends with 17:20-26, which reiterates both themes, so that the discourse is framed by these motifs, identifying them as the dominant thread in the entire section.[1] Although part of the farewell, these verses are spoken to God in prayer, rather than to the disciples. The prayer begins at 17:1 and ends with v.

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