idolatry

Proper 21

September 29, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 32:1-3a, 6-15
Reading 2: 
Psalm 91:1-6, 14-16
Reading 3: 
1 Timothy 6:6-19
Reading 4: 
Luke 16:19-31
By David Lull

This week’s texts continue to explore the inseparability of religion and politics, the contrast between faithfulness and idolatry, the grave danger of the love of wealth, and the relationship between divine judgment and hope.

Jeremiah 32:1-3a, 6-15

Proper 26

November 4, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Deuteronomy 6:1-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 146
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 9:11-14
Reading 4: 
Mark 12:28-34
By Russell Pregeant

I choose the alternative First Reading but stay with Psalm 146 in order to emphasize the anti-idolatry theme in the gospel text. What Jesus identifies as the “first” commandment—love of God with all of one’s heart, soul, mind and strength—is a slightly modified version of Deuteronomy 6:4-5, traditionally known as the Shema (= Hebrew for “hear,” the first word of the passage). (The Markan version adds “mind” to the list and uses a different Greek term for “strength” than is found in the Septuagint.) The Shema prohibits idolatry in two ways.

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