grace

Proper 8

June 29, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 22:1-14
Reading 2: 
Psalm 13
Reading 3: 
Romans 6:12-23
Reading 4: 
Matthew 10:40-42
By Ron Allen

The Priestly theologians gave Genesis 22:1-14 its present shape in the shadow of the exile. Two themes are especially important. First, the text rejects child sacrifice. Some of Israel’s neighbors followed this practice (e.g. Deut 12:31; 2 Kgs 16:3; 21:6; 23;10; Isa 57:5; Jer 7:31; 19:5; 32:35), but according to Genesis 21:1-14, God never intended child sacrifice (cf. Lev 18:21; 20:2-5).

Proper 9

July 8, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Ezekiel 2:1-5
Reading 2: 
Psalm 123
Reading 3: 
2 Corinthians 12:2-10
Reading 4: 
Mark 6:1-13
By Paul Nancarrow

Ezekiel 2:1-5

This passage is part of the call narrative of Ezekiel, specifically the moment when God commissions Ezekiel to be God’s prophet. Leading up to this call is Ezekiel’s vision of the throne-chariot of God, which takes up all of Chapter 1 of the book, and leaves Ezekiel so overwhelmed by divine glory that he collapses in a heap on the bank of the Chebar River. It is because Ezekiel is thus dazed and confused that God must begin with him by saying “O mortal, stand up on your feet, and I will speak with you.”

1st Sunday after Epiphany

January 13, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 42:1-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 29
Reading 3: 
Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
Matthew 3:13-17
By Bruce G. Epperly

What does it mean to be "chosen?" This is the theme of the First Sunday after Epiphany.

Isaiah speaks of one being chosen to be a "light to the nations," Psalm 29 describes all creation as a chosen vehicle for the revelation of divine power and wisdom, and the historical reading from Acts affirms that all persons, Jews and foreigners, are chosen for God’s salvation. In that same spirit, the Gospel affirms the choice of Jesus as God’s vehicle of salvation and invites each one of us to claim the Christ spirit in our own lives.

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