Good Friday

Good Friday

April 18, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
John 18:1-19:42
Reading 4: 
Hebrews 10:16-25
Alt Reading 1: 
Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
By Ignacio Castuera

I have read several of the past years Lectionary Commentaries in Process & Faith for both Good Friday and Easter. I also read Ask Dr. Cobb responding to questions about sacrifice in August of 2013.

Holy Saturday

April 3, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Lamentations 3:1-9, 19-24
Reading 2: 
Psalm 31:1-4, 15-16
Reading 3: 
1 Peter 4:1-8
Reading 4: 
John 19:38-42
By Bruce G. Epperly

Holy Saturday is the most neglected day in Holy Week. The celebrations of Palm Sunday, give way to the Last Supper of Holy Thursday, and the searing pain of Good Friday. On Holy Saturday, nothing happens. On Holy Saturday, we experience the silence of death. We don’t know whether the death of Jesus will be a tragedy, a hopeless defeat, or a comedy, an unexpected happy ending.

Good Friday

March 25, 2005
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
By Joseph A. Bracken

In many respects, Good Friday for Christians is like Yom Kippur for Jews: a day of asking forgiveness for one’s sins of the past and promising to lead a better life with the help of divine grace in the future. Yet, beneficial as these rituals of atonement may be for one’s personal spiritual life, they still sometimes raise questions about our ongoing relationship to God. Does God require specific penitential practices as a condition of offering us forgiveness for our sins?

Good Friday

April 14, 2006
See Also: 

Lenten Candle Liturgy
Lenten Benedictions/Commissioning/Blessings

Preaching Lent/Easter I
Preaching Lent/Easter II
Preaching Lent/Easter III

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus
Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13–53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By John B. Cobb, Jr.

The lectionary readings for this day are lengthy, including two chapters from the Gospel of John. These constitute a deeply moving account of how an innocent man was unjustly convicted, executed, and buried. It has been read by hundreds of millions of people and has deepened their devotion. Much sacrificial and loving action has come about because of its effects. Verse by verse it is a rich source of homiletical material.

Good Friday

April 6, 2007
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Good Friday liturgy
Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)
John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption

Back in Print:
Biblical Teaching on the Death of Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13–53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16–25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1–19:42
By Paul S. Nancarrow

On this day, the liturgical reading of scripture is centered on the solemn proclamation of the Johannine Passion. While the passages from Isaiah and the Psalter and Hebrews of course have their own integrity in their own contexts, on this day, for Christians, they are interpreted in the field of force of John’s account of the crucifixion. Our commentary, therefore, begins with the passage from John.

Good Friday

April 10, 2009
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Russell Pregeant

The alternative epistle reading, Hebrews 4:14-16, 5:7-9, provides an interesting and potentially fruitful counterpoint to John’s passion narrative. Hebrews and the Gospel of John were both major sources of the eventual development of the doctrine of the two natures of Christ. There is, however, little indication of Jesus’ humanity in John’s account of his arrest and trial. There is no hint of the agony in Gethsemane portrayed in the synoptics, and throughout the story Jesus seems to be the one in control of the unfolding events.

Good Friday

April 10, 2009
See Also: 

Lenten Candle Liturgy
John Cobb on redemption
Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Russell Pregeant

The alternative epistle reading, Hebrews 4:14-16, 5:7-9, provides an interesting and potentially fruitful counterpoint to John’s passion narrative. Hebrews and the Gospel of John were both major sources of the eventual development of the doctrine of the two natures of Christ. There is, however, little indication of Jesus’ humanity in John’s account of his arrest and trial. There is no hint of the agony in Gethsemane portrayed in the synoptics, and throughout the story Jesus seems to be the one in control of the unfolding events.

Good Friday

April 14, 2006
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Lenten Candle Liturgy
Lenten Benedictions/Commissioning/Blessings

Preaching Lent/Easter I
Preaching Lent/Easter II
Preaching Lent/Easter II

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus
John Cobb on Death of Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13–53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16, 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By John B. Cobb, Jr.

The lectionary readings for this day are lengthy, including two chapters from the Gospel of John. These constitute a deeply moving account of how an innocent man was unjustly convicted, executed, and buried. It has been read by hundreds of millions of people and has deepened their devotion. Much sacrificial and loving action has come about because of its effects. Verse by verse it is a rich source of homiletical material.

Good Friday Service

Call to Worship:

Come to this place apart to pray;
God, who has given us life, meets us here.
Will God be revealed to us on this dark day?
Has not God turned away and forsaken us?
Come, all who are weary and discouraged,
God, whom you have trusted, has not deserted you.
Will God hear our cries and replenish our strength?
Who can believe in the midst of such sorrow?
Come, all who have laid loved ones to rest;
God, who grieves with us, watches with us now.

Good Friday

April 10, 2009
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Russell Pregeant

The alternative epistle reading, Hebrews 4:14-16, 5:7-9, provides an interesting and potentially fruitful counterpoint to John’s passion narrative. Hebrews and the Gospel of John were both major sources of the eventual development of the doctrine of the two natures of Christ. There is, however, little indication of Jesus’ humanity in John’s account of his arrest and trial. There is no hint of the agony in Gethsemane portrayed in the synoptics, and throughout the story Jesus seems to be the one in control of the unfolding events.

Good Friday

March 21, 2008
See Also: 

Lenten Candle Liturgy
John Cobb on redemption
Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Rick Marshall

Discussing the Text

Good Friday

March 21, 2008
See Also: 

Lenten Candle Liturgy
John Cobb on redemption
Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Russell Pregeant

The passion narratives in all four gospels are virtual minefields of problems for those who preach from a progressive theological stance. To begin with, they are riddled with passages and motifs that have fed anti-Jewish sentiments through the centuries. And, particularly when combined with the lectionary readings such as those from Hebrews and the Hebrew Bible, they can easily be read in such a way as to lend support to notions of atonement that call God’s essential goodness into question and stretch the limits of reasonable thought.

Good Friday

April 6, 2007
See Also: 

Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Sermons:
John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13 –53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16 –25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1–19:42
By Paul S. Nancarrow

On this day, the liturgical reading of scripture is centered on the solemn proclamation of the Johannine Passion. While the passages from Isaiah and the Psalter and Hebrews of course have their own integrity in their own contexts, on this day, for Christians, they are interpreted in the field of force of John’s account of the crucifixion. Our commentary, therefore, begins with the passage from John.

Good Friday

April 14, 2006
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By John B. Cobb, Jr.

The lectionary readings for this day are lengthy, including two chapters from the Gospel of John. These constitute a deeply moving account of how an innocent man was unjustly convicted, executed, and buried. It has been read by hundreds of millions of people and has deepened their devotion. Much sacrificial and loving action has come about because of its effects. Verse by verse it is a rich source of homiletical material.

Good Friday

March 25, 2005
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
By Joseph A. Bracken

In many respects, Good Friday for Christians is like Yom Kippur for Jews: a day of asking forgiveness for one’s sins of the past and promising to lead a better life with the help of divine grace in the future. Yet, beneficial as these rituals of atonement may be for one’s personal spiritual life, they still sometimes raise questions about our ongoing relationship to God. Does God require specific penitential practices as a condition of offering us forgiveness for our sins?

Syndicate content