easter

Seventh Sunday of Easter

May 17, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 1:1-11/Luke 24:44-53
Reading 2: 
Psalm 93
Reading 3: 
Ephesians 1:15-23
Reading 4: 
John 17:6-19
By Ron Allen

SEVENTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

(Observed as Ascension Sunday)

May 17, 2015

 

Acts 1:1-11/Luke 24:44-53

Sixth Sunday of Easter

May 10, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 10:44-48
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 3: 
1 John 5:1-6
Reading 4: 
John 15:9-17
By Ron Allen

SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

May 10, 2015

 

Acts 10:44-48

Luke’s Jesus is an end-time prophet who announced that the transition from the old age to the Realm is underway. The Realm can be partially realized in the present, especially through the eschatological community of the church, but will be fully manifest only after the apocalypse

Fifth Sunday of Easter

May 3, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 8:26-40
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22:25-31
Reading 3: 
1 John 4:7-21
Reading 4: 
John 15:1-8
By Ron Allen

FIFTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

May 3, 2015

 

Acts 8:26-40

This story has suffered considerable exegetical abuse in the name of a good cause. The preacher contrasts restrictive, legalistic, oppressive Judaism that excluded the Eunuch from participating in the religious life of the temple with Jesus and the apostles who welcomed the Eunuch into the church with “boundary-shattering” inclusiveness.

Fourth Sunday of Easter

April 26, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 4:5-12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 23
Reading 3: 
1 John 3:16-24
Reading 4: 
John 10:11-18
By Ron Allen

FOURTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

April 26, 2015


Acts 4:5-12

Third Sunday of Easter

April 19, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 3:12-19
Reading 2: 
Psalm 4
Reading 3: 
1 John 3:1-7
Reading 4: 
Luke 24:36b-48
By Ron Allen

THIRD SUNDAY OF EASTER

April 19, 2015

Acts 3:12-19

A basic principle of exegesis is that the interpreter should mark the starting and ending of a text at natural division points. The lectionary violates this principle by ending the reading with Acts 3:19 which is mid-way through a sentence. The reading should be Acts 3:12-26.

Second Sunday of Easter

April 12, 2015
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 4:32-35
Reading 2: 
Psalm 133
Reading 3: 
1 John 1:1-10
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-31
By Ron Allen

SECOND SUNDAY OF EASTER

April 12, 2015

 

Acts 4:32-35

Easter Sunday

April 20, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 10:34-43
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
Colossians 3:1-4
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18
Alt Reading 2: 
Matthew 28:1-10
Alt Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 31:1-6
By Ignacio Castuera

 

 

This is the day when preachers have the opportunity to speak to many who come to church only for the “high holidays” of our faith. The Scriptures provided for pastors are chock full of opportunities to make a lasting impression on those who come infrequently. On the other hand, the faithful flock also needs to hear the eternal message of EasterEcology,  with new angles, new vigor, well, new life!

7th Sunday of Easter

May 20, 2007
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 97
Reading 3: 
Acts 16:16-34 and Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, 20-21
Reading 4: 
John 17:20-26
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 16:16–34

7th Sunday of Easter/Ascension Sunday

May 16, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 47
Reading 3: 
Acts 1:1-11 and Ephesians 1:15-23
Reading 4: 
Luke 24:44-53
By Bruce G. Epperly

“What shall we say as moderate and progressive Christians about Jesus’ ascension?” The Ascension narrative raises an unspoken, but significant, question “What shall we do about the Risen Jesus?” The Ascension, as a literary device, serves to get Jesus “off stage” and let the disciples get on with the work of the church. Everything in the post-resurrection narratives is foreshadowing a time in which the disciples will move from followers to leaders, shaping the future of Christ’s mission.

6th Sunday of Easter

May 20, 2001
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 67
Reading 3: 
Acts 16:9-15 and Revelation 21:1-10, 21:22-22:5
Reading 4: 
John 14:23-29
By Bruce G. Epperly

Acts 16:9-15

6th Sunday of Easter

May 13, 2007
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 67
Reading 3: 
Acts 16:9-15 and Revelation 21:1-10, 21:22-22:5
Reading 4: 
John 14:23-29
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 16:9–15

6th Sunday of Easter

May 9, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 67
Reading 3: 
Acts 16:9-15 and Revelation 21:1-10, 21:22-22:5
Reading 4: 
John 14:23-29
By Bruce G. Epperly

Once again, the lectionary asserts that mysticism leads to mission. The journey inward prompts the journey outward. Acts describes Paul’s visionary experience that leads him to change his plans and journey to Philippi. John suggests that we can “live” Christ’s word. Psalm 67 awakens us to living in a world of praise and Revelation challenges us to live with mindfulness and integrity.

5th Sunday of Easter

May 13, 2001
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 148
Reading 3: 
Acts 11:11-18 and Revelation 21:1-6
Reading 4: 
John 13:31-35
By Bruce G. Epperly

Acts 11:11-18

5th Sunday of Easter

May 9, 2004
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 148
Reading 3: 
Acts 11:11-18 and Revelation 21:1-6
Reading 4: 
John 13:31-35
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 11:1-18

5th Sunday of Easter

May 6, 2007
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 148
Reading 3: 
Acts 11:1-18 and Revelation 21:1-6
Reading 4: 
John 13:31-35
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 11:1-18  

5th Sunday of Easter

May 2, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 148
Reading 3: 
Acts 11:1-18 and Revelation 21:1-6
Reading 4: 
John 13:31-35
By Bruce G. Epperly

Today’s readings integrate diversity and intimacy in light of the unitive power of love, both God’s and our own. A commitment to loving one another, despite our differences, may deliver us from the rampant acrimony that has infected politics and church life. God seeks diversity in non-human and human life, and faithfulness to God calls us to embrace difference, even theological and liturgical, as a gift from God.

4th Sunday of Easter

May 6, 2001
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 23
Reading 3: 
Acts 9:36-43 and Revelation 7:9-17
Reading 4: 
John 10:22-30
By Bruce G. Epperly

Commentator's Note: Easter is the most unsettling season of the Christian year. We are challenged to reframe our world view and expand the realm of possibility to include the miraculous and unexpected. The resurrection breaks down the walls of limitation within which we have confined ourselves and our understanding of God’s presence in the world. New life bursts forth in our hearts and minds, in our marriages and relationships, and in our social order, when we least expect it.

4th Sunday of Easter

May 2, 2004
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 23
Reading 3: 
Acts 9:36-43 and Revelation 7:9-17
Reading 4: 
John 10:22-30
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 9:36-43

4th Sunday of Easter

April 29, 2007
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 23
Reading 3: 
Acts 9:36-43 and Revelation 7:9-17
Reading 4: 
John 10:22-30
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 9:36-43

4th Sunday of Easter

April 25, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 23
Reading 3: 
Acts 9:36-43 and Revelation 7:9-17
Reading 4: 
John 10:22-30
By Bruce G. Epperly

Today’s scriptures describe God’s faithful and everlasting care. God is our companion in life and death, and, in the spirit of today’s readings, beyond. Resurrection is a whole-person and whole-creation reality that touches us in mind, body, and spirit.

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