death

Good Friday

April 18, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
John 18:1-19:42
Reading 4: 
Hebrews 10:16-25
Alt Reading 1: 
Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
By Ignacio Castuera

I have read several of the past years Lectionary Commentaries in Process & Faith for both Good Friday and Easter. I also read Ask Dr. Cobb responding to questions about sacrifice in August of 2013.

Proper 5

June 9, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
1 Kings 17:17-24
Reading 2: 
Psalm 30
Reading 3: 
Galatians 1:11-24
Reading 4: 
Luke 7:11-17
By David Grant Smith

1 Kings 17:17-24       

Salvation after Death?

Question: 
“In talking to some of my fundamental Christian friends the claim has been made that physical death holds the finality of acceptance of salvation, i.e. salvation must be attained prior to physical death. I just can't see physical death as being the absolute final 'chance.' I've looked and have not found anything in the Bible that says that death is the final point of acceptance or rejection. I know that this is the tradition in many denominations but I wonder if this also holds true in process theology.”
Publication Month: 
January 2005
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

Life after Death

Question: 
Can you explain the Process view of our 'life after physical death.' Are our satisfactions resurrected into God and do they grow into what they could be in God's aim? Will we be able then to grow into God's aim?
Publication Month: 
October 1999
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

The question asked this month is more specific than the general topic of life after physical death. It is about the Consequent Nature of God and what it means that we are taken up into this. "Are our satisfactions resurrected into God and do they grow into what they could be in God's aim? Will we be able then to grow into God's aim?"

Bodily Resurrection

Question: 
Ever since I encountered Lewis Ford's account of the resurrection appearances in the chapter in The Lure of God, I have sought out process theology's answer to the question of a bodily resurrection. Currently I am reading your chapter on the resurrection in Christ in a Pluralistic Age and I was curious to see how much you have changed in the 30-plus years since that book was published. What would John B. Cobb, Jr., say today if he were in a debate with someone such as, say, William Lane Craig. What is the process approach to the resurrection of Christ?
Publication Month: 
May 2007
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

A Process-Relational Guide to Death, Grief, and Funerals

Author - First Name: 
Rick
Author - Last Name: 
Marshall

This is a collection of resources for those who deal with death and grief and are in a pastoring role, who are interested in using a process-relational theology as a framework for aid and comfort, and who need to organize a funeral service. This resource is based on my 24 years of ministry, and especially on my experience of pastoring those who have been in the grip of grief over the death of a loved one. I, too, am acquainted with grief. These resources are what I have found helpful for myself and in helping others in grief.

Whitehead and Freud's Theory of Eros (Love) & Thanatos (Death)

Question: 
In the later more sociological Freud, there is a great emphasis on Love (or Eros) which, as a newcomer to Process thought and theology, I cannot help but think of as a vision of the process God. Freud, however, found it necessary to balance Love with Death (aggression), and he describes the universe as the arena in which the battle of Love and Death takes place. I am reluctant to follow Freud in affirming this second power, but at the same time I find it difficult not to feel it is needed. In particular, I find it hard to understand why God's (Love's) persuasive power would not be more effective were there not this countering power. In fact, I find it difficult to understand why persuasion toward the good would not be completely effective minus some countering contrary power.
Publication Month: 
March 2010
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

Of course, the categories that arise in one system are not likely to be identical with those that arise in another. But all systems must account for both coming into being and ceasing to be, both life and death, both construction and destruction. In Whitehead the pair of terms might be creativity and perpetual perishing.

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