common good

Proper 17

August 31, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Exodus 3:1-15
Reading 2: 
Psalm 105:1-6, 23-26, 45c
Reading 3: 
Romans 12:9-21
Reading 4: 
Matthew 16:21-28
By Russell Pregeant

The gospel lesson expresses the ultimate paradox that lies at the heart of the New Testament message: we must lose our lives in order to find them. This paradox is essential to Christian faith, but it must be treated with the utmost care; for it can be, and too often is, interpreted in a destructive way. Directed to persons with control over their own destinies, it is a legitimate call to self-sacrifice on behalf of others and the common good.

Sacrificial Thinking

Question: 
In what ways does process thought support or challenge sacrificial thinking?
Publication Month: 
August 2013
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Sacrifice is so pervasive, so central to human life, that in very important ways, if process thought fails to support sacrificial thinking, it is seriously inadequate. If parents failed to sacrifice anything for the sake of their children, their children would be unlikely to survive. Maternal sacrifice is characteristic of most species of animals.

Obama Second Term

Question: 
Do you have any reasons to hope that President Obama will be “better” in his second term?
Publication Month: 
January 2013
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

This is one of those many places where we need to distinguish the “hope” about which the question asks from optimistic expectation. I am not optimistic, but I do have hope.

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