atonement

Good Friday

April 18, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
John 18:1-19:42
Reading 4: 
Hebrews 10:16-25
Alt Reading 1: 
Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
By Ignacio Castuera

I have read several of the past years Lectionary Commentaries in Process & Faith for both Good Friday and Easter. I also read Ask Dr. Cobb responding to questions about sacrifice in August of 2013.

Proper 19A

September 11, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Exodus 14:19-31
Reading 2: 
Psalm 114
Reading 3: 
Romans 14:1-12
Reading 4: 
Matthew 18:21-35
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Exodus 14:19-31

4th Sunday of Easter

May 15, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:42-47
Reading 2: 
Psalm 23
Reading 3: 
I Peter 2:19-25
Reading 4: 
John 10:1-10
By Bruce G. Epperly

This Sunday’s lectionary readings can be interpreted through the lens of John 10:10, whose words may be quite countercultural in our current era of personal, congregational, and political scarcity thinking. “I came that they might have life and have it abundantly.” Today’s moderate and progressive Christians are constantly receiving messages of gloom and doom – shrinking budgets, program cutbacks, marginalization, and the demise of the institutional church as we’ve known it.

3rd Sunday of Easter

May 8, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:14a, 36-41
Reading 2: 
Psalm 116:1-4:12-19
Reading 3: 
I Peter 1:17-23
Reading 4: 
Luke 24: 13-35
By Jeanyne B Slettom

Acts 2:14a, 36-41
If we read the entire book of Acts as a narrative arc that brings the gospel from Jerusalem to Rome, then these early chapters are essential for establishing the kernel out of which the Christian church will grow. Therefore it is interesting that the key message in this passage is the call to repent—which parallels the start of Jesus’ ministry (Matthew 4:17, Mark 1:15).

Atonement

Question: 
"In what ways can Whitehead's process philosophy assist process theologians to understand the doctrine of atonement?"
Publication Month: 
August 1998
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

Sometimes by the atonement we mean any theory of the salvific work of Jesus. Sometimes we mean a rather specific theory, such as that of St. Anselm, about how Jesus' death opened the way for God's forgiveness of our sins. In the former sense, all Christians must have some idea of atonement. In the latter sense, there are other options.

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