Russell Pregeant

Proper 11

July 18, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Amos 8:1-12
Reading 3: 
Colossians 1:15-28
Reading 4: 
Luke 10:38-42
Alt Reading 1: 
Genesis 18:1-10a
By Russell Pregeant

As Turid Karlsen Seim has noted, earlier interpretations of Luke 10:38-42 often circumvented the gender perspective by turning the two sisters into symbols such as works versus righteousness or the active versus the contemplative life.1 However, Luke’s well-known emphasis upon women as active agents insures that this story does in fact manifest a concern for gender roles; and the specific effect of the story is to challenge standard cultural expectations in this regard.

Proper 12

July 25, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Hosea 1:2-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 138
Reading 3: 
Colossians 2:6-15
Reading 4: 
Luke 11:1-13
Alt Reading 1: 
Genesis 18:20-32
By Russell Pregeant

The alternate first reading, Genesis 18:20-32, is particularly amenable to preaching from a process perspective for two reasons. First, it is a clear example of the strain of biblical thought in which God is not immutable (as is claimed by traditional theology) but is in fact subject to change in some ways. Second, it presupposes an understanding of ethics that stands in tension with a simplistic theory of divine command—that is to say, an understanding that involves something akin to natural revelation.

Proper 10

July 11, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Amos 7:7-17
Reading 3: 
Colossians 1:1-14
Reading 4: 
Luke 10:25-37
Alt Reading 1: 
Deuteronomy 30:9-14
By Russell Pregeant

The gospel reading could be combined with the Amos text to good effect in a sermon stressing the inclusiveness that characterizes God’s love and is hence required of those who follow Christ. The introduction to the parable of the Good Samarian in Luke 10:25-29 sets the stage as Jesus endorses the lawyer’s summation of the law in the dual love commandment. And the parable itself, combined with the conclusion of the pericope in vv. 36-37, provides a specific focus on the “other”—the outsider, the enemy, the unacceptable one—as the unlikely neighbor to whom one owes one’s love.

Proper 9

July 4, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
2 Kings 5:1-14
Reading 3: 
Galatians 6:1-6, 7-16
Reading 4: 
Luke 10:1-11, 16-20
By Russell Pregeant

It is Matthew that gives us the Great Commission (18:16-20), but in many ways Luke is the missionary gospel par excellence. This is especially so when we consider its companion volume, Acts, which takes the reader through the early stages of the advance of the gospel into the Gentile world. Even taken by itself, however, Acts has a strong missionary thrust; and this week’s lectionary text is one of the key components in that motif.

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