Paul S. Nancarrow

Proper 16

August 25, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 51:1-6
Reading 3: 
Romans 12:1-8
Reading 4: 
Matthew 16:13-20
By Paul S. Nancarrow

While the readings appointed for this week have many points of connection, they are also rich with their own meanings and internal structures. I will comment on each one separately (omitting the psalm), pointing out where some of the connections with the other readings may be made.

Proper 15

August 18, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 56:1, 6-8
Reading 2: 
Psalm 67
Reading 3: 
Romans 11:1-2a, 29-32
Reading 4: 
Matthew 15:(10-20), 21-28
By Paul S. Nancarrow

This week’s lectionary stresses the universality of God’s saving grace. The readings emphasize that relationship with God is not limited by particularities of nationality, social status, previous history—or indeed by any preconditions of person, group, or society.

Proper 14

August 11, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
1 Kings 19:9-18
Reading 2: 
Psalm 85:8-13
Reading 3: 
Romans 10:5-15
Reading 4: 
Matthew 14:22-33
By Paul S. Nancarrow

One of the things I find most engaging about process-relational theology is its understanding of the relationship between God and the world.

Proper 13

August 4, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 55:1-5
Reading 2: 
Psalm 145:8-9, 14-21
Reading 3: 
Romans 9:1-5
Reading 4: 
Matthew 14:13-21
By Paul S. Nancarrow

The theme that connects the scripture lessons assigned for this Sunday is the proclamation of the abundance of God’s grace, the promise that God gives to God’s creatures more than they can ask or imagine.

Proper 4

May 29, 2005
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Deuteronomy 11:18-21, 26-28
Reading 2: 
Psalm 31:1-5, 19-24
Reading 3: 
Romans 1:16-17, 3:22b-28, (29-31)
Reading 4: 
Matthew 7:21-29
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Taken together, the lessons for this day constitute an extended reflection on the importance of active faith. Faith that makes a difference in life is both received as a gift from God, and also enacted as a characteristic of one’s own life and self.

Trinity Sunday

May 22, 2005
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Genesis 1:1-2:4a
Reading 2: 
Psalm 8
Reading 3: 
2 Corinthians 13:11-13
Reading 4: 
Matthew 28:16-20
By Paul S. Nancarrow

In preaching on Trinity Sunday, I often point out that it is the only day in the church year given to the celebration of a theological doctrine. Other days on the liturgical calendar are given to the celebration of events in the life of Christ (Christmas, Easter), or images of Christ’s ministry (Good Shepherd Sunday, Christ the King Sunday), or events in the life of the church (saints’ days, World Communion Sunday, Reformation Sunday).

Pentecost Sunday

May 15, 2005
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 104:24-34, 35b
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 12:3b-13 or Acts 2:1-21
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-23
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Pentecost serves in many respects as the “Feast of the Holy Spirit” in Christian traditions. The work of the Holy Spirit in the world and in believers is often specifically tied to relationships and the unification of many into one. John Macquarrie calls the Spirit “unitive Being”; Peter Hodgson thinks of the Spirit as the “synthesis” in the divine dialectic. For a process-relational view, it is especially suggestive to look at the Spirit as God’s power of relationality at work in the world.

Easter Sunday

April 8, 2007
See Also: 

Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Sermons:
John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 15:19-26 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 10:34-43

Good Friday

April 6, 2007
See Also: 

Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Sermons:
John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13 –53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16 –25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1–19:42
By Paul S. Nancarrow

On this day, the liturgical reading of scripture is centered on the solemn proclamation of the Johannine Passion. While the passages from Isaiah and the Psalter and Hebrews of course have their own integrity in their own contexts, on this day, for Christians, they are interpreted in the field of force of John’s account of the crucifixion. Our commentary, therefore, begins with the passage from John.

Process & Faith Table Grace

Author - First Name: 
Paul
Author - Last Name: 
Nancarrow

(sung to Tallis Canon)


O gracious Giver of all good
And loving keeper of our deeds,
Accept our thanks for this good food
And serve through us our neighbor's needs.

1st Sunday of Advent

December 2, 2007
See Also: 

Advent Liturgy

John Cobb on Incarnation

Daniel Day Williams on incarnation
Preaching Christmas

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 2:1-5
Reading 2: 
Psalm 122
Reading 3: 
Romans 13:11-14
Reading 4: 
Matt 24:36-44
By Paul S. Nancarrow

The season of Advent is a time of preparation for the coming (Latin adventus) of Christ. We usually think of this as preparing for the church’s remembrance of the coming of Christ in the birth of Jesus, celebrated in the feast of Christmas. But another ancient theme in the Advent season is preparing for the coming of Christ at the end of time, the “second” coming in which this created order will be deconstructed and reconstructed into the realized Reign of God.

Teaching Process

Teaching Process Theology

Most of what follows is in outline form; i.e., these are not lectures, but show how different pastors/instructors have organized the material for adult study groups.

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