Joseph A. Bracken

Easter Sunday

March 27, 2005
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Sermons:
Nance 2006

Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

By Joseph A. Bracken

For many Christians belief in the bodily resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday and in their own resurrection either at the end of the world or immediately after death has come to seem like wishful thinking. Despite the explicit testimony of the Gospel writers and of St.

Good Friday

March 25, 2005
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
By Joseph A. Bracken

In many respects, Good Friday for Christians is like Yom Kippur for Jews: a day of asking forgiveness for one’s sins of the past and promising to lead a better life with the help of divine grace in the future. Yet, beneficial as these rituals of atonement may be for one’s personal spiritual life, they still sometimes raise questions about our ongoing relationship to God. Does God require specific penitential practices as a condition of offering us forgiveness for our sins?

Easter Sunday

March 27, 2005
See Also: 

Liturgies

Sermons:
Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 31:1-6
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
Colossians 3:1-4 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18 or Matthew 28:1-10
By Joseph A. Bracken

For many Christians belief in the bodily resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday and in their own resurrection either at the end of the world or immediately after death has come to seem like wishful thinking. Despite the explicit testimony of the Gospel writers and of St.

Good Friday

March 25, 2005
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
By Joseph A. Bracken

In many respects, Good Friday for Christians is like Yom Kippur for Jews: a day of asking forgiveness for one’s sins of the past and promising to lead a better life with the help of divine grace in the future. Yet, beneficial as these rituals of atonement may be for one’s personal spiritual life, they still sometimes raise questions about our ongoing relationship to God. Does God require specific penitential practices as a condition of offering us forgiveness for our sins?

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